Streamer ItsSliker Admits To Scamming Over $200,000 From Followers To Fuel Gambling Addiction

The streamer on Twitch and former Team Liquid member ItsSliker recently admitted to having stolen a sum of money estimated at well over $200,000 from fans and followers in order to fuel a growing gambling addiction. The web of lies and deceit created by the content creator only came crashing down when debtors began to share their stories on social media.

“I used to gamble a lot of my money. Basically, all my Twitch money,” ItsSliker apologized. “I would come across streamers and ask them if I could borrow money. I wouldn’t give them the reason, obviously. Because it was gambling, I would lie to them.” The streamer noted how they “never intended on scamming anyone,” promising to pay back the stolen money.

The popular content creators and fellow streamers xQc and Trainwreck were apparently both involved in the affair as debtors, the latter claiming to have given more than $100,000 to ItsSliker, something which seems to have caused their friendship to crumble.

“This is what gambling has done for me,” ItsSliker said. “That shit is dangerous. This is the epitome of a fucking gambling addict. I used to lie to my viewers and say to my viewers ‘I used to gamble a long time ago.’ It was a lie. I used to continuously gamble.” ItsSliker went on to apologize for hurting “hard working individuals,” promising to “get help” in the near future.

The news broke when a user on Twitch going by the name of Mikelpee shared a video featuring ItsSliker asking for money. The streamer claims to have been denied access to their bank account before asking their followers for help and promising to pay them back in a couple of months. The video soon turned up on Reddit, prompting a user known as 0161MannyOnTheMap to reply with a series of chat logs from Discord.

The content creators began coming forward shortly afterwards. The streamer on Twtich known as Lukeafk for example admitted to having loaned ItsSliker more than $27,000. “This is super embarrassing, but I don’t know what else to do at this point,” Lukeafk explained. “I lost $27,000 from giving a loan to ItsSliker. I thought that I could trust him and I guess I just couldn’t.”

The remarks by Lukeafk appear to have prompted the popular streamer Asmongold to seek out some of those involved as debtors to determine the amount of money given to ItsSliker. Knut, Lacari, and Mizkif all came forward, Asmongold estimating the money lost at over $200,000.

ItsSliker has admitted to lying about their bank account being locked, remarking that most of the borrowed money was either spent on supporting their gambling addiction or servicing earlier debts.

This comes in the context of an ongoing debate about gambling streams. The contention all got started when xQc began handing out promotional codes for an online casino called Stake. The streamer later admitted to a gambling addiction. “I’m just easily addicted, so I just shouldn’t gamble,” xQc said at the time. “I still do it. Is that good? No, that’s terrible. That’s an illness. That’s ill. I’m ill. But you know what? I can afford to be ill. I’m lucky.”

The streamer claimed to have lost over $2 million to online casinos earlier this year, noting shortly afterwards how their followers had gambled away $119 million using their promotional codes. “It’s not that bad,” xQc explained. “$119 million. It’s not crazy. That’s rookie numbers compared to some of these nutjobs.” The content creator responded to critics by claiming the money “always comes back somehow.”

The remarks proffered by xQc prompted numerous other content creators to come out against gambling sponsorships. “A lot of these websites, Stake and all of them, if they have a code, if you are offering a code, that means that Stake is tracking all of your losses and you are getting a percentage of your fanbase's losses,” Hasan for example noted. “That is quite literally the truth. That is how fucking bad it is. They let you in on it. They let you in on the losses of your fucking fanbase.”

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