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Boris Johnson issues warning about ‘blizzard’ of coronavirus

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Emerging evidence, from the UK and other countries, has shown that youngsters between the ages of 12 to 17 are at increased risk of myocardititis if they get a Covid vaccine soon after being infected with SARS-CoV-2. Initial recommendations from the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) stated that teenagers should wait at least four weeks from testing positive for Covid to then have a vaccine. Now, however, the UKHSA has increased the recommendation from four to 12 weeks.

Dr Mary Ramsay, Head of Immunisations at UKHSA, said: “Based on a highly precautionary approach, we are advising a longer interval between COVID infection and vaccination for those aged under 18.

“This increase is based on the latest reports from the UK and other countries, ativan esophageal spasm which may suggest that leaving a longer interval between infection and vaccination will further reduce the already very small risk of myocarditis in younger age groups.”

Dr Ramsay wanted to reassure young people, parents, and carers that “myocarditis is extremely rare – at whatever point they take up the vaccine”.

“This change has been made based on the utmost precaution,” Dr Ramsay emphasised.

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Such a revision only applies to young people who are not in a high risk group.

Those aged 18 and above should still take up their vaccine offer if they are four weeks post a positive test.

This is because they are at higher risk of the complications of COVID-19 infection.

“We keep all advice under constant review and will revise it according to the latest data and evidence,” added Dr Ramsay.

Myocarditis

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) explained that myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle.

While many people will recover from myocarditis without any complications, if severe, the heart muscle can be damaged.

Symptoms of myocarditis include:

  • A stabbing pain and/or tightness in the chest which may spread across the body
  • Shortness of breath when lightly exercising or walking
  • Difficulty breathing when resting
  • Flu-like symptoms such as a high temperature, tiredness and fatigue
  • Palpitations or an abnormal heart rhythm.

Treatment can involve close monitoring, as well as anti-inflammatory medicines.

Public Health England (PHE) stated: “The COVID-19 vaccines are safe.

“If you or your child has experienced no symptoms of myocarditis then there is no reason to be worried if they had their first dose at less than 12 weeks following infection.”

Side effects of myocarditis would appear “within a few days of vaccination”.

Furthermore, many of those who did develop myocarditis following vaccination made a full recovery after rest and “simple treatments”.

There are signs, however, that warrant a call to NHS 111 or an appointment with a doctor.

If young people experience any of the following symptoms after receiving their vaccination, they should call 111 or see their GP:

  • Pain and/or tightness in the chest which may spread across the body
  • Pain in the neck that may spread across the shoulders and/or arms
  • Shortness of breath when lightly exercising or walking
  • Difficulty breathing when resting or feeling light-headed
  • Flu-like symptoms such as a high temperature, tiredness and fatigue
  • Palpitations or an abnormal heart rhythm
  • Feeling like you need to be sick.

PHE added: “In younger people, protection from natural infection is likely to be high for at least three months, so they will be protected against COVID-19 infection for some time.”

This means that “teenagers and parents should not be concerned about prolonging the date when they can get vaccinated to 12 weeks following prior infection”.

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